Collect: Jonathan Myrick Daniels, Seminarian and Martyr, 1965 (Aug 14)

In the moment of decision he risked and gave his life for another

 

Jonathan Myrick Daniels

Jonathan Myrick Daniels was born in Keene, New Hampshire, in 1939. He was shot and killed by an unemployed highway worker in Hayneville, Alabama, August 14, 1965.

From high school in Keene to graduate school at Harvard, Jonathan wrestled with the meaning of life and death and vocation. Attracted to medicine, the ordained ministry, law and writing, he found himself close to a loss of faith when his search was resolved by a profound conversion on Easter Day 1962 at the Church of the Advent in Boston. Jonathan then entered the Episcopal Theological School in Cambridge, Massachusetts. In March 1965, the televised appeal of Martin Luther King, Jr. to come to Selma to secure for all citizens the right to vote drew Jonathan to a time and place where the nation’s racism and the Episcopal Church’s share in that inheritance were exposed.

He returned to seminary and asked leave to work in Selma where he would be sponsored by the Episcopal Society for Cultural and Racial Unity. Conviction of his calling was deepened at Evening Prayer during the singing of the Magnificat: “ ‘He hath put down the mighty from their seat and hath exalted the humble and meek. He hath filled the hungry with good things.’ I knew that I must go to Selma. The Virgin’s song was to grow more and more dear to me in the weeks ahead.”

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Holy Women, Holy Men

Collect for this Remembrance

O God of justice and compassion, you put down the proud and mighty from their place, and lift up the poor and the afflicted: We give you thanks for your faithful witness Jonathan Myrick Daniels, who, in the midst of injustice and violence, risked and gave his life for another; and we pray that we, following his example, may make no peace with oppression; through Jesus Christ the just one, who lives and reigns with you and the Holy Spirit, one God, for ever and ever. Amen.

In our prayer, we give thanks for Jonathan, a young man “who, in the midst of injustice and violence, risked and gave hiss life for another.” Jonathan did not die long ago and far away; he died less than 60 years ago right here in the United States. Sadly, the divisions and violence that marked America in his day continue in our own. So we boldly ask the God of justice and compassion to bless us that “we, following [the example of Jonathan], may make no peace with oppression.” May we say and do those things that are right and good and in accord with the mind and heart of Jesus Christ. ~Fr. Dan

Be well. Do good. Pay attention. Keep learning.

Image: The Encyclopedia of Alabama

May God …

An Easter Blessing for you in the Great Fifty Days

The butterfly: symbol of the resurrection.

May God, who is present in sunrise and nightfall,
and in the crossing of the sea,
guide our feet as we go.

May God who is with us when we sit
and when we stand,
encompass us with love
and lead us by the hand.

May God who knows our paths,
and the places where we rest,
be with us in our waiting,
be our good news for sharing
and lead us in the way that is everlasting.
Amen.

The Iona Community

In Jan McFarlane (2012-02-27). Pocket Prayers of Blessing (Pocket Prayers Series)
(Kindle Locations 535-544). Hymns Ancient and Modern Ltd. Kindle Edition.

Be blessed throughout the Great Fifty Days of Easter ~Fr. Dan

Be well. Do good. Pay attention. Keep learning.

Image: Watercolor by Elanie Moore and used as the cover art for the Easter Season Worship Booklet at St. Hugh’s Episcopal Church in Idyllwild, CA.

Peace to you

An Easter Blessing for you from the People of God in Idyllwild, CA.

The butterfly: symbol of the resurrection.

Solemn Blessing in the Easter Season

May Almighty God, who has redeemed us and made us his children through the resurrection of his Son our Lord, bestow upon you the riches of his blessing. Amen.

May God, who through the water of baptism has raised us from sin into newness of life, make you holy and worthy to be united with Christ for ever. Amen.

May God, who has brought us out of bondage to sin into true and lasting freedom in the Redeemer, bring you to your eternal inheritance. Amen.

And the blessing of God Almighty, the Father, the Son, and the Holy Spirit, be upon you and remain with you for ever. Amen.

Book of Occasional Services 2003, p. 26

Be blessed throughout the Great Fifty Days of Easter ~Fr. Dan

Be well. Do good. Pay attention. Keep learning.

Image: Watercolor by Elanie Moore and used as the cover art for the Easter Worship Booklet at St. Hugh’s Episcopal Church in Idyllwild, CA.

Deep Peace to You

Blessings of words and music this day.

The Sundays in Lent are not counted in the 40 days of Lent. On the Sundays in Lent we share words of blessing. Be blessed ~Fr. Dan

Deep Peace is today’s blessing:

Be well. Do good. Pay attention. Keep learning.

For the beauty of the earth

Beauty is all around us. Slow down. Enjoy. Give thanks.

We give you thanks, most gracious God, for the beauty of earth and sky and sea; for the richness of mountains, plains, and rivers; for the songs of birds and the loveliness of flowers. We praise you for these good gifts, and pray that we may safeguard them for our posterity. Grant that we may continue to grow in our grateful enjoyment of your abundant creation, to the honor and glory of your Name, now and for ever. Amen.

The Book of Common Prayer, 840

Enjoy the beauty of creation. As you do, give thanks, and do what you can to “safeguard [this beauty] for our posterity.” ~Fr, Dan

Be well. Do good. Pay attention. Keep learning.

Saint Joseph remembered

Let us walk in God’s ways, delighting in God’s will.

 

Embroidered symbol of St. Joseph

O God, who from the family of your servant David raised up Joseph to be the guardian of your incarnate Son and the spouse of his virgin mother: Give us grace to imitate his uprightness of life and his obedience to your commands; through Jesus Christ our Lord, who lives and reigns with you and the Holy Spirit, one God, for ever and ever. Amen.

Collect of the Day, March 19, St. Joseph in The Book of Common Prayer, 219

On March 19th the church remembers Joseph, husband of Mary and, to all earthly appearances, the father of Jesus. May you experience God’s grace as you hear, listen, ponder, and then act upon God’s call and invitation to you to walk in his ways and delight in his will. ~Fr. Dan

“Joseph” from Lesser Feasts and Fasts, 2006

In the face of circumstances that distressed even a man of such tenderness and obedience to God as Joseph, he accepted the vocation of protecting Mary and being a father to Jesus. He is honored in Christian tradition for the nurturing care and protection he provided for the infant Jesus and his mother in taking them to Egypt to escape Herod’s slaughter of the innocents, and in rearing him as a faithful Jew at Nazareth. The Gospel according to Matthew pictures Joseph as a man of deep devotion, open to mystical experiences, and as a man of compassion, who accepted his God-given responsibility with gentleness and humility.

Joseph was a pious Jew, a descendant of David, and a carpenter by trade. As Joseph the Carpenter, he is considered the patron saint of the working man, one who not only worked with his hands, but taught his trade to Jesus. The little that is told of him is a testimony to the trust in God which values simple everyday duties, and gives an example of a loving husband and father.

Be well. Do good. Pay attention. Keep learning

Image: Windstar Embroidery Designs

Collect: Frances Jane (Fanny) Van Alstyne Crosby, Hymnwriter, 1915 (Feb 11)

Echoes of mercy, whispers of love … words that still touch the heart

Fanny Crosby and Blessed Assurance

Fanny Crosby was the most prolific writer of hymn texts and gospel songs in the American evangelical tradition of the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. She wrote more than eight thousand sacred texts in addition to other poetry.

Frances Jane Crosby was born in Putnam County, New York, on March 24, 1820. Although not born blind, she lost her sight as an infant as a result of complications from a childhood illness. At the age of fifteen, she entered the New York Institute for the Blind where she would later teach for a number of years. In 1858, she married Alexander van Alstyne, a musician in New York who was also blind. Crosby was a lifelong Methodist.

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Holy Women, Holy Men

O God, the blessed assurance of all who trust in you: We give you thanks for your servant Fanny Crosby, who, though blind from infancy, beheld your glory with great clarity of vision and spent her life giving voice to your people’s heartfelt praise; and we pray that we, inspired by her words and example, may rejoice to sing of your love, praising our Savior all the day long; who lives and reigns with you and the Holy Spirit, one God in perfect harmony, now and for ever. Amen.

In our prayer we give thanks for Fanny Crosby who, “though blind from infancy, beheld [God’s] glory with great clarity of vision.” We pray that, “inspired by her words and example” we may sing God’s praises—in our words and example—all the day long. May it be so. ~Fr. Dan

Be well. Do good. Pay attention. Keep learning.

Image: Church Marketing Sucks