Collect: St. Mary the Virgin (Aug 15)

Celebrating Mary a woman of profound faith

 

Mary and Child Fresco. Catacombs of Priscilla

 

The honor paid to Mary, the Mother of Jesus Christ, goes back to the earliest days of the Church. Two Gospels tell of the manner of Christ’s birth, and the familiar Christmas story testifies to the Church’s conviction that he was born of a virgin. In Luke’s Gospel, we catch a brief glimpse of Jesus’ upbringing at Nazareth, when the child was wholly in the care of his mother and his foster-father, Joseph.

During Jesus’ ministry in Galilee, we learn that Mary was often with the other women who followed Jesus and ministered to his needs. At Calvary, she was among the little band of disciples who kept watch at the cross. After the resurrection, she was to be found with the Twelve in the upper room, watching and praying until the coming of the Spirit at Pentecost.

Mary was the person closest to Jesus in his most impressionable years, and the words of the Magnificat, as well as her humble acceptance of the divine will, bear more than an accidental resemblance to the Lord’s Prayer and the Beatitudes of the Sermon on the Mount.

Later devotion has claimed many things for Mary which cannot be proved from Holy Scripture. What we can believe is that one who stood in so intimate a relationship with the incarnate Son of God on earth must, of all the human race, have the place of highest honor in the eternal life of God. A paraphrase of an ancient Greek hymn expresses this belief in very familiar words: “O higher than the cherubim, more glorious than the seraphim, lead their praises, alleluia.”

Lesser Feasts and Fasts, 2006

The intimate relationship of mother and child

Collect for St. Mary the Virgin

O God, you have taken to yourself the blessed Virgin Mary, mother of your incarnate Son: Grant that we, who have been redeemed by his blood, may share with her the glory of your eternal kingdom; through Jesus Christ our Lord, who lives and reigns with you, in the unity of the Holy Spirit, one God, now and for ever.  Amen.
The Book of Common Prayer, 243

 

It’s a simple prayer. May we, who love Jesus, be blessed to share with Mary “the glory of [God’s] eternal kingdom.” Let us respond to God’s “Yes” with the faithfulness of Mary whose love of Jesus has been remembered and celebrated throughout the Christian centuries. ~Fr. Dan

Be well. Do good. Pay attention. Keep learning.

Image: Wikimedia Commons

Collect: Jonathan Myrick Daniels, Seminarian and Martyr, 1965 (Aug 14)

In the moment of decision he risked and gave his life for another

 

Jonathan Myrick Daniels

Jonathan Myrick Daniels was born in Keene, New Hampshire, in 1939. He was shot and killed by an unemployed highway worker in Hayneville, Alabama, August 14, 1965.

From high school in Keene to graduate school at Harvard, Jonathan wrestled with the meaning of life and death and vocation. Attracted to medicine, the ordained ministry, law and writing, he found himself close to a loss of faith when his search was resolved by a profound conversion on Easter Day 1962 at the Church of the Advent in Boston. Jonathan then entered the Episcopal Theological School in Cambridge, Massachusetts. In March 1965, the televised appeal of Martin Luther King, Jr. to come to Selma to secure for all citizens the right to vote drew Jonathan to a time and place where the nation’s racism and the Episcopal Church’s share in that inheritance were exposed.

He returned to seminary and asked leave to work in Selma where he would be sponsored by the Episcopal Society for Cultural and Racial Unity. Conviction of his calling was deepened at Evening Prayer during the singing of the Magnificat: “ ‘He hath put down the mighty from their seat and hath exalted the humble and meek. He hath filled the hungry with good things.’ I knew that I must go to Selma. The Virgin’s song was to grow more and more dear to me in the weeks ahead.”

Read more…

Holy Women, Holy Men

Collect for this Remembrance

O God of justice and compassion, you put down the proud and mighty from their place, and lift up the poor and the afflicted: We give you thanks for your faithful witness Jonathan Myrick Daniels, who, in the midst of injustice and violence, risked and gave his life for another; and we pray that we, following his example, may make no peace with oppression; through Jesus Christ the just one, who lives and reigns with you and the Holy Spirit, one God, for ever and ever. Amen.

In our prayer, we give thanks for Jonathan, a young man “who, in the midst of injustice and violence, risked and gave hiss life for another.” Jonathan did not die long ago and far away; he died less than 60 years ago right here in the United States. Sadly, the divisions and violence that marked America in his day continue in our own. So we boldly ask the God of justice and compassion to bless us that “we, following [the example of Jonathan], may make no peace with oppression.” May we say and do those things that are right and good and in accord with the mind and heart of Jesus Christ. ~Fr. Dan

Be well. Do good. Pay attention. Keep learning.

Image: The Encyclopedia of Alabama

Praying for rain …

Praying in hope and expectation.

A prayer for rain from the BCP

July 18, 2017. Idyllwild, CA. Since the winter snows there has been little moisture on the mountain. Today and tomorrow we have a slight chance of rain. We pray that it may be so. ~Fr. Dan

Be well. Do good. Pay attention. Keep learning.

Grant me the lamp of love

Luminous with a love for others.

Oil lamp. Lit.

Grant me, O Lord, the lamp of love which never grows dim, that it may shine in me and warm my heart, and give light to others through my love for them, and by its brightness we may have a vision of the Holy City where the true and inextinguishable light shines, Jesus Christ our Lord. Amen.

A prayer by Columbanus (550-615) in Michael Counsell, Ed.,
2000 Years of Prayer Kindle Edition.

As we move into Saturday (the week day this was posted) how did you do with giving “light to others through [your] love for them”? How can you learn from the good you have done and expand into a new week? ~Fr. Dan

Be well. Do good. Pay attention. Keep learning.

2000 Years of Prayer (Amazon)

Image: Church Art

 

Bless those who follow in his steps

Praying for those who minister to others.

A caregiving prayer

Though the language may be a bit dated for your 21st century taste, the sentiments expressed reach back to the time and ministry of Jesus. May we be faithful in our ministry to others. May we pray for each other (in words old and new) in our various ministries. ~Fr. Dan

Be well. Do good. Pay attention. Keep learning.

Image: The Episcopal Church (on Twitter)

Collect: Ini Kopuria, Founder of the Melanesian Brotherhood, 1945 (Jun 6)

A prayer for strength to fulfill our Baptismal Covenant

Ini Kopuria. Chapel at Tabalia.

Collect for the Commemoration

Loving God, we bless your Name for the witness of Ini Kopuria, founder of the Melanesian Brotherhood: Open our eyes that we, with these Anglican brothers, may establish peace and hope in service to others; for the sake of Jesus Christ, who with you and the Holy Spirit lives and reigns, one God, for ever and ever. Amen.

“Open our eyes that we … may establish peace and hope in service to others.” Read a short summary of the story of Ini Kopuria to understand better what we are asking of God. Then, remember your (Baptismal) Covenant with God and other Christ-followers: With the help of God I will strive for justice and peace among all people and will respect the dignity of every human being. Finally, know that God will surely answer this prayer in our own lives. ~Fr. Dan

Be well. Do good. Pay attention. Keep learning.

Image: The Melanesian Brotherhood. “The picture on the left is of the stained glass window from the chapel at Tabalia The picture is of Ini Kopyria (in the middle) flanked by (left) non Christian – heathen; and on the right by a (female) companion – praying for the work of the brothers.”