Collect: The Baptism of our Lord

Mosaic: Baptism of Christ (Detail)

In our Episcopal Lectionary (and the Revised Common Lectionary, too) the first Sunday after the Epiphany (January 6) is dedicated to recalling the Baptism of our Lord.  This event is recorded in all four Gospels. In today’s Collect we pray that we may keep the (Baptismal) Covenant we have made while we “boldly confess [Jesus] as Lord and Savior.” 

Father in heaven, who at the baptism of Jesus in the River Jordan proclaimed him your beloved Son and anointed him with the Holy Spirit: Grant that all who are baptized into his Name may keep the covenant they have made, and boldly confess him as Lord and Savior; who with you and the Holy Spirit lives and reigns, one God, in glory everlasting. Amen.

Book of Common Prayer, 214

For further reading

A prayer for the beauty of the earth

A flower opening to lightAs another weekend unfolds consider the beauty of the earth, give thanks, and enter into the wonders of creation. Also recognize your role in safeguarding these wonders for those who will come after us. ~Fr. Dan

We give you thanks, most gracious God, for the beauty of earth and sky and sea; for the richness of mountains, plains, and rivers; for the songs of birds and the loveliness of flowers. We praise you for these good gifts, and pray that we may safeguard them for our posterity. Grant that we may continue to grow in our grateful enjoyment of your abundant creation, to the honor and glory of your Name, now and for ever. Amen.

Book of Common Prayer, 840

Collect for Epiphany

The Feast of the Epiphany is always January 6 in our Liturgical Calendar. This is the Collect (a prayer at the beginning of our worship) used on this Feast Day.

O God, by the leading of a star you manifested your only Son to the peoples of the earth: Lead us, who know you now by faith, to your presence, where we may see your glory face to face; through Jesus Christ our Lord, who lives and reigns with you and the Holy Spirit, one God, now and for ever. Amen.

Book of Common Prayer, 214

Collect: Bach, Handel, Purcell

In the Episcopal Church (and many others) Thursday evening is the day when the choir and its musician(s) typically meet. On this Thursday in January we share a Collect used on day the Church remembers Johann Sebastian Bach, George Frederick Handel, and Henry Purcell (Jul 28th). You can easily adapt this Collect as you pray for the musicians and singers in your life. We encourage you to share your (adapted) prayer with them.

Almighty God, beautiful in majesty and majestic in holiness, who teaches us in Holy Scripture to sing your praises and who gave your musicians Johann Sebastian Bach, George Frederick Handel and Henry Purcell grace to show forth your glory in their music: Be with all those who write or make music for your people, that we on earth may glimpse your beauty and know the inexhaustible riches of your new creation in Jesus Christ our Savior; who lives and reigns with you and the Holy Spirit, one God, for ever and ever. Amen.

Source

Johann Sebastian Bach, George Frederick Handel, and Henry Purcell, Composers, 1750, 1759, 1695
Standing Commission on Liturgy and Music

What is a Collect?

Healthy Mind Healthy Body®: 5 things not to do with your smartphone

UnitedHealthcare provides a quick check list of 5 things that you and I shouldn’t do with our smartphones.

begin-quote-purple-x7152Hang up on some habits that may be harmful to you and othersThere’s no denying smartphones make life more interesting. These handy gadgets can do amazing things — from finding the nearest Thai food to filming baby’s first steps.But for our safety and well-being, there are a few things we shouldn’t do while glued to our screens. Here are five not-so-smart behaviors to avoid.

Go to the post to discover the 5 (Common Sense) things to “not do.”

Source: Healthy Mind Healthy Body®: 5 things not to do with your smartphone

What is a Collect?

 

begin-quote-purple-x7152What is a Collect? The origin of the term collecta, while rather obscure, refers to the “gathering of the people together” as well as to the “collecting up” of the petitions of individual members of the congregation into one prayer. This at first extemporaneous prayer would later also be connected to the Epistle and Gospel appointed for the day. A Collect is a short prayer that asks “for one thing only” (Fortescue) and is peculiar to the liturgies of the Western Churches, being unknown in the Churches of the East. It is also a literary form (an art comparable to the sonnet) usually, but not always, consisting of five parts.

Read more here: “The Collect”

Source: “Introduction.” Zahl, Paul F. M. and Barbee, C. Frederick, eds. The Collects of Thomas Cranmer. Grand Rapids, MI: Wm. B. Eerdmans Publishing Company. 1999. [Kindle Edition]

Collect: Elizabeth Seton (Jan 4)

Elizabeth SetonLike Roman Catholics and the Orthodox, Episcopalians honor our ancestors in the faith, men and women of exceptional character and action as Christ-followers, who inspire and encourage us along the Way. The Collect used on the day they are honored often asks for graces to become a better Christ-follower in our day and in our lives.

Holy God, you blessed Elizabeth Seton with your grace as wife, mother, educator and founder, that she might spend her life in service to your people: Help us, by her example, to express our love for you in love of others; through Jesus Christ our Redeemer, who lives and reigns with you and the Holy Spirit, one God, for ever and ever. Amen.

Elizabeth Seton | Standing Commission on Liturgy and Music

What is a Collect?