Thyroid Cancer is the Fastest-Growing Cancer in America

In seeking to keep older Americans healthy and well, the AARP regularly posts information and suggestions for each of us to consider. Here is a recent article about Thyroid Cancer.

 

1140-fastest-growing-cancer-thyroid-imgcache-reve903b0d08c837f03d844e9711be5117d

Originally posted by Cheryl Bond-Nelms, on AARP, July 5, 2017.

As with all articles expressing facts and/or opinions about health and wellness: nothing in the sharing of this article is meant to be medical advice. Please consult your own healthcare provider as you monitor and/or research your own health needs.

Begin quote

Nearly three out of four cases of thyroid cancer are found in women.

Although the death rate from cancer in America is down 25 percent since 1991, there is one type of cancer rapidly increasing in the U.S. According to the American Cancer Society, the chance of being diagnosed with thyroid cancer has tripled over the last three decades, making it the fastest-growing cancer.The thyroid is a gland located in the front of the neck, shaped like a butterfly. It produces hormones that enter the bloodstream and affect the metabolism, heart, brain, muscles and liver, and keep the body functioning properly and effectively.The estimates for cases of thyroid cancer in America for 2017 have increased, and rates are higher in women than men, according to these figures published on cancer.org.

  • In 2017, there will be an estimated 56,870 new cases of thyroid cancer  — 42,470 in women and 14,400 in men.
  • An estimated 2,010 deaths will result from thyroid cancer  — 1,090 in women and 920 in men.

Women account for nearly three-quarters of thyroid cancer cases. The exact cause of most thyroid cancers is unknown. Research has concluded that better imaging technology has increased the number of thyroid cancer cases diagnosed. “Much of this rise appears to be the result of the increased use of thyroid ultrasound, which can detect small thyroid nodules that might not otherwise have been found in the past,” the American Cancer Society says.What are the signs or symptoms related to thyroid cancer? The American Cancer Society lists the following on cancer.org:

  • lump in the neck, sometimes growing quickly
  • Swelling in the neck
  • Pain in the front of the neck, sometimes going up to the ears
  • Hoarseness or other voice changes that do not go away
  • Trouble swallowing
  • Trouble breathing
  • A constant cough that is not due to a cold

Talk with your doctor immediately if you have any of the signs or symptoms associated with thyroid cancer. Noncancerous conditions or even other cancers can also cause many of the symptoms.How can you protect yourself?Experts say most people found to have thyroid cancer have no known risk factors, and so emphasize that most cases can not be prevented. Professionals suggest regular self-exams to catch thyroid changes in the earliest stages as one of the best means of protection.Here are five steps to performing a self-exam from thyroidawareness.com:

  1. Hold a mirror in your hand, focusing on the lower front area of your neck, above the collarbones and below the voice box (larynx).
  2. While focusing on this area in the mirror, tip your head back.
  3. Take a drink of water and swallow.
  4. As you swallow, look at your neck. Check for any bulges or protrusions in this area when you swallow. Reminder: Don’t confuse the Adam’s apple with the thyroid gland. The thyroid gland is located farther down the neck, closer to the collarbone. You may want to repeat this process several times.
  5. If you see any bulges or protrusions in this area, see your physician. You may have an enlarged thyroid gland or a thyroid nodule that should be checked to determine whether further evaluation is needed.

Health professionals estimate that 15 million Americans have undiagnosed thyroid problems. The good news is that the survival rate of thyroid cancer patients is higher than for most other cancers. Early detection of thyroid cancer can open up more treatment options. You can also ask your doctor to check your thyroid health with a thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) test, a blood test that can determine whether the gland is functioning normally.

End quoted material

Even more information

Taboo to Caregivers

11 Things you should never say.

huomon_001

Begin quoteI’ve had so much support from friends and family through 35 years of family caregiving. But every now and then people say things that really frustrate and annoy me. So I reached out to other family caregivers and asked if there were things they also wish people would never say to them. People surely don’t intend to be offensive: They just might not understand caregivers’ perspectives or haven’t thought carefully about what they’re saying.

If you know someone who is a family caregiver, please try to avoid saying these things that are truly not helpful and may be hurtful.

1. “You should…” This comment just makes us feel judged and defensive. When it comes from people who aren’t intimately involved in our caregiving journeys and often have no idea of the actual needs of our loved ones, it makes us feel resentful. It’s particularly frustrating when people assume we don’t know something obvious, or haven’t already tried what they’re suggesting.

Instead: Consider saying, “You’re doing a tremendous job! If you have challenges that you’re trying to solve I’d be happy to help you brainstorm and research new approaches if that would be helpful. I don’t want to suggest things you’ve already been doing or have ruled out.”

Keep reading there’s more

Hearing Loss, Hearing Aid and More Health Advances From 2016

I live with a significant hearing loss. I am grateful that with the help of hearing aids I am able to enjoy the sounds of the mountain and forest and hear the people around me. I read this article with interest. ~Fr. Dan

I was intrigued by this part of the longer post:

Hearing loss is being recognized as a national health issue

In June, a series of recommendations on hearing loss announced by the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine seemed to be proof that hearing is loss is finally getting its due as a national health issue.

If followed, these 12 recommendations — combined with those made the previous autumn by a presidential commission on science and technology — could result in a revolution in hearing health care. They would provide changes that would open the market to a wider range of hearing technology and devices, making it easier for consumers to “find and fully use the appropriate, affordable, and high-quality services, technologies, and support they need.”

Attention please.Read the entire AARP post here: Hearing Loss, Hearing Aid and More Health Advances From 2016 – AARP

For further reading